Schizophrenia Articles A-Z

Alcohol and Clozapine - Clozapine and Breastfeeding

This page contains links to eMedTV Schizophrenia Articles containing information on subjects from Alcohol and Clozapine to Clozapine and Breastfeeding. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Alcohol and Clozapine
    It is generally recommended that people avoid combining alcohol and clozapine. This eMedTV Web page explains the reasons why you shouldn't drink while taking clozapine and includes what to tell your doctor if you are drinking while taking the drug.
  • Alcohol and Haldol
    Alcohol may increase the risk of Haldol side effects (such as drowsiness or low blood pressure). This eMedTV page talks about alcohol and Haldol in more detail, explaining why it is generally recommended that you avoid alcohol while taking this drug.
  • Alcohol and Invega
    Combining alcohol and Invega may potentially be dangerous. As this eMedTV page explains, drinking alcohol while taking Invega can increase your risk of developing side effects, such as low blood pressure or drowsiness.
  • Alcohol and Loxitane
    It is not recommended to drink alcohol while taking Loxitane. This eMedTV Web page talks about alcohol and Loxitane, including several reasons why the two should not be combined, as well as information on what to do if you do drink alcohol.
  • Alcohol and Navane
    This eMedTV Web page explains that combining alcohol and Navane can increase your risk of side effects, and that it is not recommended that you drink while taking Navane. This page provides more detail on why the two drugs should not be combined.
  • Alcohol and Stelazine
    Generally, you should not drink alcohol and take Stelazine at the same time. As this eMedTV article explains, combining alcohol and Stelazine can increase your risk of several side effects, such as low blood pressure or drowsiness.
  • Alcohol and Trilafon
    Alcohol can increase the risk and severity of Trilafon side effects (such as drowsiness). This eMedTV article explores alcohol and Trilafon in more detail, explaining why it is generally recommended that you avoid alcohol while taking this drug.
  • Alcohol and Zyprexa
    Alcohol may increase the risk of Zyprexa side effects (such as drowsiness). This selection from the eMedTV archives talks about alcohol and Zyprexa, explaining why it is generally recommended that you avoid alcohol while taking this drug.
  • Antipsychotic Drugs -- Information
    Haldol, Abilify, and Saphris are just a few of the many antipsychotic drugs available. This eMedTV resource takes a look at the different types of antipsychotic drugs, including a link to more in-depth information on this topic.
  • Antipsychotic Medication Withdrawal
    Symptoms of antipsychotic medication withdrawal include vomiting, dizziness, and shakiness. This eMedTV selection covers these and other withdrawal symptoms, and also explains what to do to reduce your risk of severe symptoms of withdrawal.
  • Antipsychotics
    Antipsychotics are prescription drugs used to treat psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers an overview of these medications, including information on the research comparing older drugs to newer ones.
  • Antipsychotics and Sexual Dysfunction
    This eMedTV article explains that impotence and a decreased sex drive are some of the possible sexual side effects of antipsychotic medications. Other sexual problems are described in this article, as are possible treatment options for sexual dysfunction.
  • Aripiprazol
    As this eMedTV page explains, aripiprazole is a prescription drug used for treating symptoms of bipolar disorder and other conditions. This article also covers side effects and dosing guidelines. Aripiprazol is a common misspelling of aripiprazole.
  • Aripiprazole
    Aripiprazole is a drug licensed to treat bipolar disorder, autism, schizophrenia, and depression. This eMedTV article discusses aripiprazole uses in more detail, explains how the medication works, and describes side effects that may occur.
  • Aripiprazole (Abilify)
    The generic name for the prescription drug Abilify is aripiprazole. This eMedTV resource presents a brief overview of this medication, with information on its uses and how it works. A link to a complete, full-length article on this topic is also included.
  • Aripiprazole Dosing
    For adults with bipolar disorder, aripiprazole dosing usually starts at 15 mg once daily. This eMedTV resource also lists the recommended aripiprazole dosage for schizophrenia and depression, and offers tips on when and how to take the medicine.
  • Aripiprazole Side Effects
    Headaches and agitation are among the common side effects of aripiprazole. This eMedTV page also lists less common side effects, as well as serious side effects that you should report to your doctor (such as rapid weight gain).
  • Atypical Antipsychotics
    Atypical antipsychotics are a type of medication used to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. This eMedTV segment offers an in-depth look at these medications, including information on their possible side effects (such as weight gain).
  • Benefits of Haldol
    Haldol is a prescription medicine used for treating psychotic disorders and various other conditions. This eMedTV resource discusses the benefits of Haldol in more detail and describes how the medication works for various conditions.
  • Benefits of Invega
    Invega is useful for minimizing hallucinations, paranoia, and other symptoms of schizophrenia. This eMedTV resource explores other benefits of Invega, describes how the drug works, and explains how often this medicine is typically taken.
  • Benefits of Risperdal
    As this eMedTV article discusses, Risperdal is a prescribed medication used to treat several conditions, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism. This page describes other benefits of Risperdal, including possible off-label uses.
  • Benefits of Zyprexa
    As this article from the eMedTV library discusses, Zyprexa is a prescribed medication used to treat several conditions, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This page also describes other benefits of Zyprexa, including possible off-label uses.
  • Catatonic Schizophrenia
    People with catatonic schizophrenia often show involuntary movements, grimacing, or unusual mannerisms. This eMedTV segment provides an overview of this disorder and offers a list of common symptoms, such as clumsiness and lack of coordination.
  • Causes of Schizophrenia
    Possible causes of schizophrenia have been linked to genetics, the brain, and environmental factors. This eMedTV Web page discusses in detail how each of these factors may play a role in the development of schizophrenia.
  • Childhood Schizophrenia
    Although rare, childhood schizophrenia can be much more difficult to treat than in adults. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed overview of this condition, with information on causes, symptoms, treatment options, and the role genetics plays.
  • Chlorpromazine
    Chlorpromazine is a drug used to treat nausea or vomiting, schizophrenia, tetanus, and other conditions. This eMedTV article lists other uses for the prescription drug, explains how it works, and offers some general dosing information.
  • Chlorpromazine Dosing
    The starting chlorpromazine dosage for severe nausea or vomiting is 10 mg to 25 mg every four to six hours. This eMedTV page also discusses chlorpromazine dosing for the treatment of schizophrenia, acute intermittent porphyria, and other conditions.
  • Chlorpromazine Hydrochloride
    This page of the eMedTV library presents a brief look at chlorpromazine hydrochloride, a drug that is used to treat a wide variety of conditions. This segment lists the different uses, provides some basic dosing guidelines, and addresses side effects.
  • Chlorpromazine Warnings and Precautions
    As this eMedTV page explains, chlorpromazine can raise the level of a hormone in the body called prolactin, possibly leading to sexual problems. This page lists other chlorpromazine warnings and precautions (such as people who should avoid the drug).
  • Clorpromazine
    Chlorpromazine is a medicine licensed to treat schizophrenia, nausea or vomiting, and other conditions. This eMedTV page lists other chlorpromazine uses and explains how the drug works. Clorpromazine is a common misspelling of chlorpromazine.
  • Clozapin
    Clozapine is a prescription antipsychotic medication used for treating schizophrenia. This eMedTV segment describes clozapine in more detail, explains how it works, and lists its common side effects. Clozapin is a common misspelling of clozapine.
  • Clozapine
    Clozapine is approved for the treatment of schizophrenia in people who fail to respond to other medications. This eMedTV segment provides an in-depth look at the drug, including its effects, suggestions for when and how to take it, and side effects.
  • Clozapine Alternatives
    This eMedTV Web page discusses several alternatives to clozapine, such as therapy and medications. This page describes the various types of drugs that are clozapine alternatives and explains how therapy can be an important part of the treatment plan.
  • Clozapine and Breastfeeding
    This segment of the eMedTV library discusses clozapine and breastfeeding in detail. It explains why the manufacturer of the drug does not recommend its use in women who are breastfeeding and what to discuss with your doctor if the drug is prescribed.
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