Schizophrenia Articles A-Z

Info on Schizophrenia - Loxitane and Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV Schizophrenia Articles containing information on subjects from Info on Schizophrenia to Loxitane and Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Info on Schizophrenia
    Schizophrenia is a mental illness that often involves delusions and disordered thinking. This eMedTV Web page gives a brief overview of schizophrenia, with info on common symptoms and how the mental disorder is treated.
  • Information on Moban
    If you are looking for information on Moban, you should know that this medication is no longer available. This eMedTV resource explains why and offers a link to more details on this antipsychotic medication.
  • Information on Thioridazine
    This eMedTV article contains information on thioridazine, a drug used to treat schizophrenia. This resource explores side effects, dosing guidelines, and more. Also included is a link to more in-depth information.
  • Inhaled Loxapine Information
    Loxapine inhalation powder is an antipsychotic drug used to treat agitation. This eMedTV page gives a brief overview of this inhaled medication, with information on how to use it, side effects, and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Invage
    Invega is a prescription drug licensed for the treatment of schizophrenia. This eMedTV article offers a more in-depth look at Invega and its effects, possible side effects, and overdose symptoms. Invage is a common misspelling of Invega.
  • Invega
    If you have schizophrenia, your doctor may prescribe Invega. This section of the eMedTV Web site explains how the prescription drug works and discusses its effects, potential side effects, and available strengths.
  • Invega (Paliperidone) Drug Information
    Invega is a prescription medication commonly used for controlling symptoms of schizophrenia. This eMedTV page offers more details on Invega (paliperidone), including how the drug works and what you should be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Invega 1.5 mg Tablets
    The usual recommended Invega dosage for treating schizophrenia is 6 mg once daily. As this eMedTV resource explains, however, people with kidney disease may need to take 1.5 mg or 3 mg Invega tablets (as they may not tolerate higher doses).
  • Invega 3 mg Tablets
    People with kidney disease who are being treated for schizophrenia often take 3 mg Invega tablets. This eMedTV article offers more detailed Invega dosing guidelines and explains what factors your doctor may consider when making dosage recommendations.
  • Invega 6 mg Tablets
    Many people being treated for schizophrenia start with 6 mg Invega tablets (one tablet daily). This part of the eMedTV Web site lists the other strengths available for this medication and provides more detailed Invega dosing guidelines.
  • Invega 9 mg Tablets
    There are four strengths available for Invega tablets; 9 mg is the highest available strength. This eMedTV resource lists other strengths of the drug and provides dosage recommendations for the treatment of schizophrenia.
  • Invega Alternatives
    Invega alternatives can include other schizophrenia medications and therapy. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible alternatives to Invega for the treatment of schizophrenia and discusses the situations in which they may be considered.
  • Invega and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether using Invega while breastfeeding is safe for the nursing child. This eMedTV page discusses Invega and breastfeeding in more detail and explains the importance of talking with your doctor about your specific situation.
  • Invega and Diabetes
    People taking Invega may be at an increased risk of developing diabetes. This part of the eMedTV Web site explores the possible link between Invega and diabetes, noting in particular why Invega may cause this serious condition.
  • Invega and Dry Mouth
    Up to 3 percent of people taking Invega have reported dry mouth as a side effect of the drug. This article on the eMedTV Web site discusses Invega and dry mouth in more detail and offers a list of suggestions for dry mouth relief.
  • Invega and Pregnancy
    Invega could potentially cause problems to the fetus if it is given to pregnant women. This eMedTV article offers more information on Invega and pregnancy, and describes the problems seen in pregnant animals that were given the medication.
  • Invega and Weight Gain
    While a little weight gain is normal with Invega, gaining too much weight can cause health problems. This eMedTV article offers more information on Invega and weight gain, and explains what your doctor may recommend to help with any weight gain.
  • Invega Dangers
    Invega can cause a life-threatening irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia) called QT prolongation. This eMedTV article further explores the potential dangers of Invega and describes some of the more common side effects that have been seen with this drug.
  • Invega Dosage
    The recommended starting dose of Invega for the treatment of schizophrenia in adults is 6 mg once a day. This eMedTV Web page provides more dosing information, including recommendations for adolescents and people with kidney disease.
  • Invega Drug Information
    There is a lot of information about the drug Invega that you should be aware of before starting treatment. This eMedTV resource describes the specific effects of Invega, explains when and how to take this medicine, and lists some potential side effects.
  • Invega Drug Information
    Invega is a prescription antipsychotic medication licensed to treat schizophrenia. This page from the eMedTV Web site contains more information on this medicine, including details on how Invega works and how dosing is determined for this drug.
  • Invega Drug Interactions
    Clozapine and methadone are among the medicines that can potentially cause Invega drug interactions. This eMedTV article lists other drugs that can potentially interact with Invega and discusses the risks of taking these drugs along with Invega.
  • Invega for Children
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Invega can help treat schizophrenia in children as young as 12 years old. This article takes a brief look at using this drug in adolescents and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Invega for Schizophrenia
    Doctors often prescribe the medication Invega to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia. This eMedTV resource talks more about treating schizophrenia with Invega and explores the specific effects of this antipsychotic medicine.
  • Invega Indications
    Invega is a prescription antipsychotic medication approved for treating schizophrenia. This segment from the eMedTV archives discusses the indications for Invega in more detail and explains whether this medicine is approved for use in children.
  • Invega Oral
    An oral medication, Invega is a prescription drug used for the treatment of schizophrenia. This eMedTV article explains how Invega works, describes its specific effects, and offers general information on when and how to take this medicine.
  • Invega Overdose
    Symptoms of an Invega overdose may include drowsiness, low blood pressure, and shakiness or tremors. This eMedTV segment lists other possible symptoms and discusses the various treatment options that are available for an Invega overdose.
  • Invega Risks
    Invega may increase the risk of stroke in elderly people who are taking the antipsychotic for dementia. This eMedTV Web page discusses other potential risks with Invega and explains what side effects may occur with the use of this medication.
  • Invega Safety
    Invega is an antipsychotic medication that may increase your risk for developing diabetes. This eMedTV Web page includes more safety information on Invega and lists some of the most common side effects that have been reported with this medication.
  • Invega Side Effects
    Common Invega side effects may include nausea, a rapid heart rate, and headaches. This section of the eMedTV library lists other common side effects of Invega, as well as side effects that you should report to your doctor (such as signs of diabetes).
  • Invega Substitute
    Many medications can be used as a substitute for Invega, including other atypical antipsychotics. This eMedTV Web page provides a list of other atypical antipsychotics and older, typical antipsychotics that can be used to treat schizophrenia.
  • Invega Sustana
    Invega Sustenna can help minimize symptoms in people with schizophrenia. This eMedTV resource takes a look at this prescription medication, including how it works and possible side effects. Invega Sustana is a common misspelling of Invega Sustenna.
  • Invega Sustena
    As this eMedTV page explains, adults who have schizophrenia may benefit from Invega Sustenna. This page describes side effects and general safety precautions to be aware of with this drug. Invega Sustena is a common misspelling of Invega Sustenna.
  • Invega Sustenna
    People with schizophrenia may benefit from the prescription medicine Invega Sustenna. This page of the eMedTV Web library presents a detailed overview of this injected medication, including how it works, how it is given, and possible side effects.
  • Invega Sustenna 156 Mg
    This eMedTV page explains that a 156-mg dose of Invega Sustenna is usually given as a second dose, one week after the initial dose. This article takes a brief look at how this antipsychotic drug is given and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Invega Sustenna 156 Mg Every 4 Weeks
    This eMedTV article looks at some general dosing guidelines for Invega Sustenna, including how it is given every 4 weeks, and when the 156-mg dose is usually started. This page further explores how this medicine is given and provides a link to learn more.
  • Invega Sustenna and Adolescents
    This eMedTV segment explains that using Invega Sustenna for schizophrenia treatment in adolescents is an "off-label" (unapproved) use of the drug. This page describes this use in more detail and links to more information.
  • Invega Sustenna and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV page, the manufacturer of Invega Sustenna (paliperidone palmitate) recommends that women not use this drug while breastfeeding. This page explores Invega Sustenna, with details on whether the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Invega Sustenna and Delusions
    When used to treat schizophrenia, Invega Sustenna can help reduce delusions and hallucinations. This eMedTV Web page explains how this antipsychotic drug works to minimize symptoms of schizophrenia and provides a link to more details.
  • Invega Sustenna and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, pregnant women should only receive Invega Sustenna (paliperidone palmitate) when the benefits outweigh the risks. This article describes some of the problems that may occur when using this drug during pregnancy.
  • Invega Sustenna Dosage
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, dosing guidelines for Invega Sustenna will be based on how you respond to the medicine and various other factors. This article describes the factors that may affect your dose and explains how this injection is given.
  • Invega Sustenna Dosing
    Your healthcare provider will inject Invega Sustenna into a muscle. This eMedTV segment offers a brief look at dosing guidelines for Invega Sustenna and provides a link to more specific details on how your dosage will be determined.
  • Invega Sustenna Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page examines possible drug interactions that may occur with Invega Sustenna, including those that may lead to potentially serious or even fatal problems. This article lists some of these products and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Invega Sustenna Injectable
    Available by prescription, Invega Sustenna is an injectable antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia. This eMedTV resource takes a brief look at this medicine, including some general dosing instructions. A link to more details is also included.
  • Invega Sustenna Medication Information
    A doctor may prescribe Invega Sustenna to treat schizophrenia in adults. This eMedTV Web selection presents more information on Invega Sustenna, including how this medication is given, possible side effects, and why it may not be safe for some people.
  • Invega Sustenna Overdose
    This eMedTV page explains that an overdose with Invega Sustenna (paliperidone palmitate) is unlikely, but possible. This article discusses some of the problems that may occur and what your doctor may do to treat any resulting symptoms.
  • Invega Sustenna Per Day
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Invega Sustenna is not given on a per-day basis; it is typically injected once a month by your healthcare provider. This page provides more details on how it is administered and links to more dosing information.
  • Invega Sustenna Side Effects
    This eMedTV article lists the side effects of Invega Sustenna that occurred during extensive clinical trials on the drug. This page describes common problems, like headaches and insomnia, as well as serious reactions, such as seizures and fever.
  • Invega Sustenna Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Invega Sustenna can be used for acute treatment and maintenance treatment of schizophrenia in adults. This article further explores these treatments, with details on how the drug works and possible off-label uses.
  • Invega Sustenna Warnings and Precautions
    As explained in this eMedTV page, Invega Sustenna may not be the best option for some people, including those with dementia or certain allergies. This article lists other warnings and safety precautions to review before using Invega Sustenna.
  • Invega Tablets
    Available in the form of oral tablets, Invega is a medication commonly used for treating schizophrenia. This eMedTV selection provides dosage recommendations for this medicine and offers information on when and how to take the tablets.
  • Invega Uses
    Invega is approved to treat adult schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder in adults. As this part of the eMedTV archives explains, Invega is also licensed to treat childhood schizophrenia. "Off-label" uses of Invega are also discussed.
  • Invega Warnings and Precautions
    Invega can increase blood sugar levels in some people, which can increase the risk of developing diabetes. This eMedTV page offers other Invega warnings and precautions, such as the safety of taking Invega while nursing or pregnant.
  • Invega Weight Change
    In clinical studies, some people noticed a change in weight while taking Invega. As this eMedTV article explains, up to 19 percent of people who took Invega during these studies increased their body weight by at least 7 percent.
  • Invega Withdraw
    If you abruptly stop taking Invega, withdrawal symptoms may occur. This eMedTV page explores potential withdrawal symptoms and explains why people may experience withdrawal from Invega. Invega withdraw is a common misspelling of Invega withdrawal.
  • Invega Withdrawal
    If you abruptly stop taking Invega, withdrawal symptoms can potentially occur. This eMedTV article lists possible symptoms of Invega withdrawal (such as insomnia) and explains the steps your doctor may take to help limit them.
  • Invega Withdrawl
    Potential symptoms of Invega withdrawal include insomnia, hallucinations, and delusions. This eMedTV article explains why withdrawal symptoms occur and how you can help limit these symptoms. Invega withdraw is a common misspelling of Invega withdrawal.
  • Latuda
    Latuda is a second-generation antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar depression. This eMedTV Web page offers a complete overview of this medication, with information on its effects, when and how to take it, safety issues, and more.
  • Latuda and Breastfeeding
    Latuda (lurasidone) passes through breast milk in rats, but does it also pass through human breast milk? This eMedTV page tells you what you need to know about breastfeeding while taking Latuda, including research that has been conducted on this topic.
  • Latuda and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Latuda (lurasidone) is a pregnancy Category B medication. This article explains what this means and discusses the safety of using this drug during pregnancy. The results of animal studies are also included.
  • Latuda and Weight Gain
    It is possible to experience weight gain while taking Latuda (lurasidone). This eMedTV resource looks at the clinical studies that examined whether this drug can cause you to gain weight and provides suggestions to help combat it.
  • Latuda Dosage
    As explained in this portion of the eMedTV Web site, dosing with Latuda usually starts at 40 mg a day. This article offers helpful tips on when and how to take this prescription drug, and lists some of the factors that will affect your dose.
  • Latuda Drug Interactions
    Ketoconazole, efavirenz, and other medications can cause drug interactions with Latuda. This eMedTV resource describes the potentially negative reactions that can occur, including some that may reduce the effectiveness of Latuda.
  • Latuda Medication Information
    Latuda is an antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia. This part of the eMedTV site provides more information on Latuda, listing some of the medication's side effects and explaining some safety issues to be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Latuda Overdose
    Taking too much Latuda (lurasidone) could lead to potentially serious problems. This eMedTV selection talks about what to expect with this type of overdose and lists some of the treatment options for a person who has overdosed on the drug.
  • Latuda Side Effects
    While most people tolerate Latuda without problems, side effects (such as nausea or anxiety) are possible. This eMedTV article provides lists of common and rare side effects seen with this drug, as well as problems that require prompt medical attention.
  • Latuda Uses
    As this eMedTV article explains, Latuda is used for schizophrenia and bipolar depression treatment. This selection takes a closer look at the uses of this antipsychotic drug, with details on how it works, who can use it, and more.
  • Latuda Warnings and Precautions
    Latuda can increase the risk of heat stroke in some people. This eMedTV segment lists other precautions and warnings with Latuda, such as those relating to drug interactions and the safety of taking this antipsychotic medication during pregnancy.
  • Loxapine Inhalation Powder
    Loxapine inhalation powder is used to treat agitation in people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. This eMedTV article describes this prescription drug in more detail, including how it works, side effects, safety concerns, and more.
  • Loxapine Inhalation Powder Dosage
    The standard dose of loxapine inhalation powder is 10 mg inhaled every 24 hours as needed. This eMedTV page examines dosing recommendations for this medication, including how to use it properly and how your healthcare provider will assist you.
  • Loxapine Inhalation Powder Side Effects
    Possible side effects of loxapine inhalation powder include sedation, a sore throat, and a bitter taste. This eMedTV selection lists common side effects that have been reported and also describes serious problems that may require medical treatment.
  • Loxitane
    Loxitane is an antipsychotic drug that is used to treat schizophrenia. This portion of the eMedTV library offers an in-depth look at the medication, including information on its uses, possible side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Loxitane Alternatives
    Loxitane alternatives can include therapy and other medications. This eMedTV page covers these alternatives in detail, explaining when they may be required and discussing what to do if you are not seeing the desired results with the drug.
  • Loxitane and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if Loxitane would have any negative effects on a breastfed infant. This eMedTV article discusses Loxitane and breastfeeding in detail, including information on what to look for if your doctor recommends the drug while you are nursing.
  • Loxitane and Dry Mouth
    This page of the eMedTV library explains that dry mouth is a possible side effect of Loxitane, but there are several ways to obtain relief. This article also includes suggestions for minimizing this side effect if dry mouth with Loxitane occurs.
  • Loxitane and Pregnancy
    Loxitane is considered a pregnancy Category C medication. This page of the eMedTV Web site discusses Loxitane and pregnancy, explaining the results of animal studies on the drug and the conditions under which it may be prescribed to a pregnant woman.
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